Goldman Sachs Programmer Back in Court on New Charges

10/08/2012 02:21

Source: Wired

File:Goldman Sachs.svgJust when he thought his troubles were over, a former programmer for Goldman Sachs who downloaded source code for the investment firm’s high-speed trading system from the company’s computers is back in New York state court on new charges that he unlawfully duplicated and used the company’s proprietary code.

Sergey Aleynikov was re-arrested last week, according to his attorney, and is being arraigned in Manhattan criminal court Thursday afternoon on state charges of “unlawful use of secret scientific material” and “unlawful duplication of computer related material.”

The new charges come after Aleynikov defeated previous federal charges against him for theft of the code. His defense attorney calls the new charges “improper.”

“I think it seems vindictive, and I’m confident that he’s going to prevail,” defense attorney Kevin Marino told Wired.

Aleynikov, 42, was convicted in 2010 under the Economic Espionage Act of 1996 (EEA), in a high-profile case that was held up by federal prosecutors as an example of the Justice Department’s serious intent to prosecute the theft of intellectual property and trade secrets.

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